Things you should know before visiting South Africa (Part 2)

4. Open your mind
There are 11 official languages in South Africa, and most of them are indigenous to the country. Around 40% of the population speak either Xhosa or Zulu. Another major language is Afrikaans, a derivative of Dutch, which will find surprisingly easy to follow by northern Europeans. Although almost everywhere you go you can easilly get by with English – which is commonly spoken in all major cities and towns, at government departments, hotels, and banks.
You‘ve ever been nowhere like South Africa. Desmond Tutu, a famous South African, described South Africa by saying that they of many races, cultures, and languages become one nation. They are the Rainbow People of God. In such a diverse country it’s truely important to remain alert to respect the culture and stay safe.
African Impact Sarah Graham says that it’s natural that when offering broad-spectrum advice for travelers, guidebooks will resort to generalization. You will be able to get into all the nooks and crannies of South Africa and venture off the beaten track to feel the rhythm of the people. The people are friendly and warm, and excited to share their culture and stories with you.
5. Great Mobile Phone Coverage
Luckily, mobile phone coverage in South Africa is easy to access and extensive. Purchase a local SIM card from one of the South Africa’s four key telcos: MTN, Vodacom, Cell C and Telkom. When you arrive at the airport you can do this.
In major cities and towns reception and internet speeds are great, but when you head into the wilderness you will lose the ability to connect fast.
Remember that you can only use a local SIM on SIM-unlocked GSM phones. Before you leave check with your mobile network provider in your home country to make sure you can use it on your phone.
You should always buy a SIM card in store at a supermarket, kiosk, or one of the official outlets, never buy off a street seller.
Listen to our podcast if you want to know more about South Africa. We talk about when something goes wrong how World Nomads swings into action, the photographer who survived a deadly snake bite and plus a shark conservation.