Tag Archives: South Africa

The state visit of Nigerian President Buhari to South Africa

On Wednesday Mr. Muhammadu Buhari Nigerian President pay a state visit to South Africa after tensions between Africa’s leading economic powerhouses is stirred due to an outburst of xenophobic violence in and around Johannesburg.

The South African authorities look set to reject the demands of Buhari who is expected to push Ramaphosa to pay reparations for the Nigerians impacted by the violence.

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa and his counterpart struggle to kickstart their stuttering economies. They will on Thursday meet to discuss political cooperation and bolstering trade ties.

But the recent violence targeting foreigners  including Nigerians in South Africa threatens to dominate the talks. In the violence at least 12 people were killed and hundreds of migrant workers repatriated to the country. After some South African companies in Nigeria were targeted by revenge attacks, they were forced to close shop temporarily. The two governments offered “sincere apologies” in a bid to calm the anger and dispatched special envoys to each other’s capitals.

The Abuja’s presidency said Buhari would discuss the welfare of Nigerian, and build harmonious relations with their hosts via finding common grounds during the state visit.

The state visit takes three day was planned in early September before mobs descended on foreign-owned properties in and around Johannesburg.

Buhari was crowned as President a second term in February, is looking to boost Nigeria’s  agricultural and mining sectors and diversify Nigeria’s economy away from oil. South Africa could prove a key partner in doing so.

But, he has been blocking the flow of goods from neighbouring Nigeramaking and  Benin protectionist moves and ordering increased restrictions on food imports, athough in July he wil sign up to a milestone African free trade agreement.

Buhari’s state visit appears unlikely to radically strengthen relations between the two sides despite incentives to improve ties.

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 4)

“I’m not a saint”

Shortly after the inauguration, President Nelson Mandela faced the risk of a new spiral of violence stemming from black hatred, the indispensable product of apartheid racism.

Nelson Mandela always thought that it was impossible to build a nation out of anger and violence. “We are fighting for progress in a way and towards an outcome that helps ensure that all people, whether white or black, become winners,” he said. With a generous heart, he promoted racial reconciliation, through negotiations to promote the democratic process in South Africa, creating a model for the adoption of political solutions to resolve conflicts. .

Madiba (Nelson’s affectionate name) was ordinary and simple, which made him a “popular great man” with the erudite knowledge of an academic, a basis to ensure peace and national reconciliation, avoiding the bloody civil war between people of color and ethnicity on this painful land. The way he chose to leave office is also very special. In African history, very few leaders want to leave office. Nelson Mandela decided to set a precedent for everyone to follow.

After leaving the presidency, Nelson Mandela continues to play an active role in many social organizations for human rights, fighting poverty and inequality. One of his main concerns is the fight against HIV/AIDS.

Responding to his honors as a saint of South Africa, Nelson asserted: “I have never, even the most remote aspect, thought of myself as a saint or tried to become a saint. I am just a normal person, due to special circumstances, I become a leader. ”

Nelson Mandela’s influence and great personality transcend national borders. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize (1993) and from 1999, the United Nations announced his birthday (July 18) every year to be called the “Mandela Day” to remember his contribution to the freedom of the world.

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 3)

Despite being treated harshly in various prison camps (he was locked up in the Atlantic Island Robben cell for 18 years out of 27 years in prison), Nelson Mandela still retains the temperament of a soldier who dare to commit to the great cause. Nelson has repeatedly denied the release of the government. That is why his reputation is growing in the hearts of South Africans despite the Apartheid government’s use of all means to prevent the spread of images and documents about him. After all, the harsh judgment of the authorities to destroy his will to fight has become ineffective.

In February 1990, after more than 10,000 days of imprisonment, Nelson was released at the age of 71. Emerging in the sky of South Africa as a great hope, right after the moment of watching the vast sky, he captured hands on the work of building freedom, mending the division in the heart of the nation. In his memoirs, he wrote: “When I stepped out of prison, my mission was to free both oppressed and oppressive people. Some people say that mission is complete. But I know it’s not. The truth is we don’t have freedom yet; we have merely gained the freedom to choose free and unrestrained lives. We have not yet taken the last steps of the journey but are only the first step on a long and difficult journey. To be free, it is not simply to remove the chains of a human being, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. The real challenge to our belief in freedom has only just begun. ”

“Thousands of ineffective injustices awaken in me indignation that demands to fight against the brutal political system that imprisoned my nation. It is impossible to remember the specific day I began to devote myself to the cause of my national liberation, my people, for me, to engage in that struggle was simple, because I could not do otherwise.”