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Antarctica recorded the first heat wave in history

In January this year, for the first time, Antarctica recorded a temperature of 9.2 degrees Celsius. It was the highest in history since the statistics began.

According to the DPA, scientists knowledgeable that the Antarctic had experienced the first heat wave in history. And they are concerned about the long-term effects this phenomenon could have on animals, plants and ecosystems here.

Experts from the Australian Antarctic Research Program have noted the occurrence of an unusual heat wave. It was discovered at the Casey Research Station on the frozen eastern continent in the summer of 2019. And they also reported record high temperatures in the Antarctic Peninsula.

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The highest temperature in history has been recorded at Casey station. And this phenomenon is called heat wave – when there are 3 consecutive days, the temperature is at the highest level.

In these days, the lowest temperature measured is above 0 degrees Celsius. While the highest temperature is above 7.5 degrees Celsius.

On January 24 recorded a record high temperature of 9.2 degrees C – never appeared in history. This is 6.9 degrees Celsius higher than the average highest heat level recorded at Casey station.

Other temperature records also appeared at research stations in the Antarctic Peninsula in February. The average daily temperature exceeds the long-term average from 2 to 2.4 degrees Celsius.

The findings were published today March 31 in the journal Global Change Biology. It is found by researchers from the University of Wollongong, the University of Tasmania and the Antarctic Division of Australia.

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The scientists conclude that based on previous experience of the times when the Antarctic summers became unusually hot. We will likely see countless biological impacts appear in the coming years. It shows the impact of climate change on the most remote regions of the planet.

Dana Bergstrom thinks hot summers will most likely lead to a long-term volatility. The change in temperature will also affect plants and animals that are used to the low temperatures of Antarctica.