Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 4)

“I’m not a saint”

Shortly after the inauguration, President Nelson Mandela faced the risk of a new spiral of violence stemming from black hatred, the indispensable product of apartheid racism.

Nelson Mandela always thought that it was impossible to build a nation out of anger and violence. “We are fighting for progress in a way and towards an outcome that helps ensure that all people, whether white or black, become winners,” he said. With a generous heart, he promoted racial reconciliation, through negotiations to promote the democratic process in South Africa, creating a model for the adoption of political solutions to resolve conflicts. .

Madiba (Nelson’s affectionate name) was ordinary and simple, which made him a “popular great man” with the erudite knowledge of an academic, a basis to ensure peace and national reconciliation, avoiding the bloody civil war between people of color and ethnicity on this painful land. The way he chose to leave office is also very special. In African history, very few leaders want to leave office. Nelson Mandela decided to set a precedent for everyone to follow.

After leaving the presidency, Nelson Mandela continues to play an active role in many social organizations for human rights, fighting poverty and inequality. One of his main concerns is the fight against HIV/AIDS.

Responding to his honors as a saint of South Africa, Nelson asserted: “I have never, even the most remote aspect, thought of myself as a saint or tried to become a saint. I am just a normal person, due to special circumstances, I become a leader. ”

Nelson Mandela’s influence and great personality transcend national borders. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize (1993) and from 1999, the United Nations announced his birthday (July 18) every year to be called the “Mandela Day” to remember his contribution to the freedom of the world.