Category Archives: South African people

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 4)

Nelson Mandela is the pride of South Africans

Nelson Mandela continued the struggle against Apartheid, which forced Congress to ratify the law to abolish the brutal decree that existed for more than a century in this country (June 1991).

In July 1991, Nelson Mandela was elected Chairman of ANC and on May 10, 1994, after winning the first democratic election in South Africa, he became President of the Leather. The first color President of the Rainbow country.

Happy ending

Although the model of the era, known and respected by the world, Nelson Mandela was still a humble, polite and lovely person.

In his private life, Nelson was unlucky. He married for the first time in 1944 and had 4 children. The marriage ended in 1957 because he spent too little time with his family. In the midst of a fierce struggle for national liberation, Nelson met and married Winnie Madikizela in June 1958. Two daughters Zenani Mandela (1959) and Zindziswa Mandela (1960) were born.

When Nelson went to prison, his family life was completely ruined. He was very grateful to his wife who carried on her family and raised her children even though she herself was wanted and imprisoned. However, due to differences in awareness in some issues, in March 1996, Nelson and his wife divorced.

His last mate was Graca Simbine, the widow of President Mozambique. This is the beautiful love affair of two people in special places in modern African history.

Mr. Mandela always said that living with Graca Machel is a great happiness for both of them

When Graca’s first husband died in a plane crash in 1986, while struggling with misery to continue living in the terrible prison on Robben Island, Nelson wrote lines to comfort the widow of the President that he admires. Mrs. Graca replied. So began a correspondence between the two people who tied their lives to the fight against injustice. Happy smiled to Nelson on his 80th birthday: “I feel that living with her is a great happiness for both of us.”

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 4)

“I’m not a saint”

Shortly after the inauguration, President Nelson Mandela faced the risk of a new spiral of violence stemming from black hatred, the indispensable product of apartheid racism.

Nelson Mandela always thought that it was impossible to build a nation out of anger and violence. “We are fighting for progress in a way and towards an outcome that helps ensure that all people, whether white or black, become winners,” he said. With a generous heart, he promoted racial reconciliation, through negotiations to promote the democratic process in South Africa, creating a model for the adoption of political solutions to resolve conflicts. .

Madiba (Nelson’s affectionate name) was ordinary and simple, which made him a “popular great man” with the erudite knowledge of an academic, a basis to ensure peace and national reconciliation, avoiding the bloody civil war between people of color and ethnicity on this painful land. The way he chose to leave office is also very special. In African history, very few leaders want to leave office. Nelson Mandela decided to set a precedent for everyone to follow.

After leaving the presidency, Nelson Mandela continues to play an active role in many social organizations for human rights, fighting poverty and inequality. One of his main concerns is the fight against HIV/AIDS.

Responding to his honors as a saint of South Africa, Nelson asserted: “I have never, even the most remote aspect, thought of myself as a saint or tried to become a saint. I am just a normal person, due to special circumstances, I become a leader. ”

Nelson Mandela’s influence and great personality transcend national borders. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize (1993) and from 1999, the United Nations announced his birthday (July 18) every year to be called the “Mandela Day” to remember his contribution to the freedom of the world.

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 3)

Despite being treated harshly in various prison camps (he was locked up in the Atlantic Island Robben cell for 18 years out of 27 years in prison), Nelson Mandela still retains the temperament of a soldier who dare to commit to the great cause. Nelson has repeatedly denied the release of the government. That is why his reputation is growing in the hearts of South Africans despite the Apartheid government’s use of all means to prevent the spread of images and documents about him. After all, the harsh judgment of the authorities to destroy his will to fight has become ineffective.

In February 1990, after more than 10,000 days of imprisonment, Nelson was released at the age of 71. Emerging in the sky of South Africa as a great hope, right after the moment of watching the vast sky, he captured hands on the work of building freedom, mending the division in the heart of the nation. In his memoirs, he wrote: “When I stepped out of prison, my mission was to free both oppressed and oppressive people. Some people say that mission is complete. But I know it’s not. The truth is we don’t have freedom yet; we have merely gained the freedom to choose free and unrestrained lives. We have not yet taken the last steps of the journey but are only the first step on a long and difficult journey. To be free, it is not simply to remove the chains of a human being, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. The real challenge to our belief in freedom has only just begun. ”

“Thousands of ineffective injustices awaken in me indignation that demands to fight against the brutal political system that imprisoned my nation. It is impossible to remember the specific day I began to devote myself to the cause of my national liberation, my people, for me, to engage in that struggle was simple, because I could not do otherwise.”

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 2)

In 1947, Nelson was elected to the Standing and directly served as Secretary of the Transvaal Union. It was his first public title at the African National Congress (ANC), the leader of the national liberation struggle movement to gain freedom and equality for South Africans.

In the white election of 1948, Daniel Malan’s National Party with Apartheid won the election. Under Malan’s iron hand, a series of bizarre laws serving the worst and bloodiest racist policy in civilized human history have been issued. ANC organized a non-violent protest movement, calling on all strikers, MITs to protest. In 1952, Nelson opened a lawyer’s office to defend the poor as well as participate in peaceful opposition activities. But in 1956 Nelson and 150 others were arrested with treason. Thanks to the defense of the lawyer, troubled for 5 years, the defendants were acquitted.

When the path of non-violent struggle was banned, the ANC leadership decided to establish an “armed wing” but an “independent organization” under the administration of the ANC. In November 1961, Nelson Mandela became the leader of the armed wing MK, using force in his struggle.

In early 1962, Nelson secretly toured a series of countries: Tanzania, Sudan, Ethiopie, Egypt, Algeria, Ghinea, Senagal and England to expand relations and enlist support in politics, economy and training military for MK. Upon returning home (August 1962), he was arrested on charges of inciting unrest and leaving South Africa illegally, sentenced to five years in prison. In June 1964, Nelson was sentenced to life hardship for “planning to destroy the state”. In court, Nelson Mandela was stunned: “I devoted my life to the South African people’s struggle. I upheld the ideal of democracy and free society in which all people equally live together in the same conditions and abilities. It is an ideal that I take for living and hope to achieve. But if I need, I will also sacrifice for that ideal. “

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 1)

Nelson Mandela was great not only because of the struggle and unyielding years in the prison, the journey to abolish the Apartheid regime or the national reconciliation effort. He was immortal because he built the foundations for democracy in South Africa.

From prisoner to president

Nelson Mandela (1918 – 2013) was born in a prison family in the village of Mvezo, Umtata district, capital of Transkei state, South Africa with the name Rolihlahla Mandela. Seven and a half years old, he went to school. During the first day of school, the white teacher gave him the English name Nelson. By the end of his life, Nelson Mandela still did not understand what that name meant and why the teacher gave him that name.

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality

The father died when Nelson was 9, another chief adopted him. In his memoir “Long Walk To Freedom”, Nelson Mandela recounted that it was the time he was raised and educated strictly to be a “successor”.

After graduating from high school, Nelson attended Fort Hare University, the “nursery” of South African intellectuals. Nelson studied hard and actively participated in sports activities. In the last academic year (1941), he was forced to leave the school because he did not succumb to the mischief of the director in the election of the Student Council Executive Committee.

Nelson came to work at a law firm and attended correspondence at the University of South Africa in Johannesburg. Despite spending too little money, Nelson still owes accommodation fee every month. Nelson had to wear the old suit his boss gave him for 5 years with lots of patches.

Life in Johannesburg opened for Nelson a new world. He was painfully aware: An African child was born only in a maternity home for Africans, only to board a bus for Africans, only in the designated area for Africans, to go to school only and find jobs for Africans and can always be stopped in the middle of the road, if he/she doesn’t bring identification cards he/she can be thrown into the jail.