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Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 4)

“I’m not a saint”

Shortly after the inauguration, President Nelson Mandela faced the risk of a new spiral of violence stemming from black hatred, the indispensable product of apartheid racism.

Nelson Mandela always thought that it was impossible to build a nation out of anger and violence. “We are fighting for progress in a way and towards an outcome that helps ensure that all people, whether white or black, become winners,” he said. With a generous heart, he promoted racial reconciliation, through negotiations to promote the democratic process in South Africa, creating a model for the adoption of political solutions to resolve conflicts. .

Madiba (Nelson’s affectionate name) was ordinary and simple, which made him a “popular great man” with the erudite knowledge of an academic, a basis to ensure peace and national reconciliation, avoiding the bloody civil war between people of color and ethnicity on this painful land. The way he chose to leave office is also very special. In African history, very few leaders want to leave office. Nelson Mandela decided to set a precedent for everyone to follow.

After leaving the presidency, Nelson Mandela continues to play an active role in many social organizations for human rights, fighting poverty and inequality. One of his main concerns is the fight against HIV/AIDS.

Responding to his honors as a saint of South Africa, Nelson asserted: “I have never, even the most remote aspect, thought of myself as a saint or tried to become a saint. I am just a normal person, due to special circumstances, I become a leader. ”

Nelson Mandela’s influence and great personality transcend national borders. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize (1993) and from 1999, the United Nations announced his birthday (July 18) every year to be called the “Mandela Day” to remember his contribution to the freedom of the world.

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 3)

Despite being treated harshly in various prison camps (he was locked up in the Atlantic Island Robben cell for 18 years out of 27 years in prison), Nelson Mandela still retains the temperament of a soldier who dare to commit to the great cause. Nelson has repeatedly denied the release of the government. That is why his reputation is growing in the hearts of South Africans despite the Apartheid government’s use of all means to prevent the spread of images and documents about him. After all, the harsh judgment of the authorities to destroy his will to fight has become ineffective.

In February 1990, after more than 10,000 days of imprisonment, Nelson was released at the age of 71. Emerging in the sky of South Africa as a great hope, right after the moment of watching the vast sky, he captured hands on the work of building freedom, mending the division in the heart of the nation. In his memoirs, he wrote: “When I stepped out of prison, my mission was to free both oppressed and oppressive people. Some people say that mission is complete. But I know it’s not. The truth is we don’t have freedom yet; we have merely gained the freedom to choose free and unrestrained lives. We have not yet taken the last steps of the journey but are only the first step on a long and difficult journey. To be free, it is not simply to remove the chains of a human being, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. The real challenge to our belief in freedom has only just begun. ”

“Thousands of ineffective injustices awaken in me indignation that demands to fight against the brutal political system that imprisoned my nation. It is impossible to remember the specific day I began to devote myself to the cause of my national liberation, my people, for me, to engage in that struggle was simple, because I could not do otherwise.”

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 2)

In 1947, Nelson was elected to the Standing and directly served as Secretary of the Transvaal Union. It was his first public title at the African National Congress (ANC), the leader of the national liberation struggle movement to gain freedom and equality for South Africans.

In the white election of 1948, Daniel Malan’s National Party with Apartheid won the election. Under Malan’s iron hand, a series of bizarre laws serving the worst and bloodiest racist policy in civilized human history have been issued. ANC organized a non-violent protest movement, calling on all strikers, MITs to protest. In 1952, Nelson opened a lawyer’s office to defend the poor as well as participate in peaceful opposition activities. But in 1956 Nelson and 150 others were arrested with treason. Thanks to the defense of the lawyer, troubled for 5 years, the defendants were acquitted.

When the path of non-violent struggle was banned, the ANC leadership decided to establish an “armed wing” but an “independent organization” under the administration of the ANC. In November 1961, Nelson Mandela became the leader of the armed wing MK, using force in his struggle.

In early 1962, Nelson secretly toured a series of countries: Tanzania, Sudan, Ethiopie, Egypt, Algeria, Ghinea, Senagal and England to expand relations and enlist support in politics, economy and training military for MK. Upon returning home (August 1962), he was arrested on charges of inciting unrest and leaving South Africa illegally, sentenced to five years in prison. In June 1964, Nelson was sentenced to life hardship for “planning to destroy the state”. In court, Nelson Mandela was stunned: “I devoted my life to the South African people’s struggle. I upheld the ideal of democracy and free society in which all people equally live together in the same conditions and abilities. It is an ideal that I take for living and hope to achieve. But if I need, I will also sacrifice for that ideal. “

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 1)

Nelson Mandela was great not only because of the struggle and unyielding years in the prison, the journey to abolish the Apartheid regime or the national reconciliation effort. He was immortal because he built the foundations for democracy in South Africa.

From prisoner to president

Nelson Mandela (1918 – 2013) was born in a prison family in the village of Mvezo, Umtata district, capital of Transkei state, South Africa with the name Rolihlahla Mandela. Seven and a half years old, he went to school. During the first day of school, the white teacher gave him the English name Nelson. By the end of his life, Nelson Mandela still did not understand what that name meant and why the teacher gave him that name.

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality

The father died when Nelson was 9, another chief adopted him. In his memoir “Long Walk To Freedom”, Nelson Mandela recounted that it was the time he was raised and educated strictly to be a “successor”.

After graduating from high school, Nelson attended Fort Hare University, the “nursery” of South African intellectuals. Nelson studied hard and actively participated in sports activities. In the last academic year (1941), he was forced to leave the school because he did not succumb to the mischief of the director in the election of the Student Council Executive Committee.

Nelson came to work at a law firm and attended correspondence at the University of South Africa in Johannesburg. Despite spending too little money, Nelson still owes accommodation fee every month. Nelson had to wear the old suit his boss gave him for 5 years with lots of patches.

Life in Johannesburg opened for Nelson a new world. He was painfully aware: An African child was born only in a maternity home for Africans, only to board a bus for Africans, only in the designated area for Africans, to go to school only and find jobs for Africans and can always be stopped in the middle of the road, if he/she doesn’t bring identification cards he/she can be thrown into the jail.

 

How did sports heal South Africa? (Part 2)

The Apartheid government soon realized that they had made a serious mistake when organizing the friendly match, so after that, football was severely suppressed in this country, to the point that white players had to retire. In schools, football is replaced by other sports such as Cricket and Rugby. Six years later, South African football was “revived” after the FIFA ban, when Sono reappeared as a hero to save the country’s football. After the feat of scoring four goals in the Argentina net, Sono went to the United States to play for New York Cosmos club, playing alongside the names of world football names such as: Pele, Beckenbauer … Earning good amount of money, in 1982, Sono returned to his hometown, bought Highland Park, the symbol of Apartheid regime. On the FIFA website on that day there was an article about the event: “It was a trade event that symbolized significance during the time when colored people were suppressed by the Apartheid regime. FIFA appreciates Sono’s work as a part of bringing South African football back to world football.

Rugby, football in South African society

Last week, the owner and team coach Jomo Cosmos (new name of Highland Park team) Sono sent deep condolences to the family of Joost van der Westhuizen-player who went into history with the victory to rise South Africa in Rugby World Cup championship 1995. On February 6, after 6 years of fighting Parkinson’s disease, Joost van der Westhuizen died at age 45 at his home.

For rugby lovers in South Africa, Joost van der Westhuizen is considered an irreplaceable legend. He made 89 appearances in the national team stage of 1993-2003 and was a key player in helping South Africa to win the Rugby World Cup 1995.

We returned to South Africa in the 60s of the last century, the rugby tournaments here included all black players, without any white players. We would imagine no football match having white player. In South African society at that time, people of color and white as on two parallel lines.

How did sports heal South Africa? (Part 1)

In order to bring the 2010 World Cup to South Africa, there was a real war in FIFA. Because at the time of the 2004 vote, many skeptics of South Africa could successfully organize the biggest football festival on the planet.

But before talking about the 2010 World Cup or Apartheid’s racist regime, to mention Rugby, sports has contributed to heal the people of this richest African country.

A year before the 2010 World Cup, director Eastwood produced the movie “Invictus”, describing the victory of the South African team at the Rugby World Cup 1995, with the role of President Nelson Mandela. The language is an unscathed sports movie but “Invictus” has a total budget of 62 million USD. The film about the Rugby World Cup in 1995 but discusses the struggle against racism that has remained since the post-Apartheid era. Movie “Invictus” about Rugby, but actually, the story is about football. That’s right, because one year after “Invictus” premiered, the 2010 World Cup kicked off in South Africa.

In April 1963, the South African government closed all stadiums. People of color have an excuse to carry out protests for fairness but all methods are ineffective. In response to the public’s request, in 1976, the South African government organized a terrible football match: the white team played against the colored team. In 1976 and 1977, there were three political “smells” like this that took place in the Rand Stadium with the victory of the white team. In order to appease the reaction of the public and the international community, on March 16, 1976, South Africa invited the Argentine team to join friendly football. For the first time, there was a South African football team with a mix of colored, white leather. However, on the Rand stadium stands, with a capacity of more than 3 ten thousand spectators, white and colored fans still have to sit in the different lots.

Several mistakes about South Africa

Many tourists think that South Africa does not have snow, even only in summer, but in fact it is not.

South Africa is a region, not a country

Many South African tourists who travel abroad get the question: “Which country are you from South Africa?”. Meanwhile, South Africa is also the name of a country located in southern Africa. The continent has more than 50 countries, including the southern region including Botswana, Lesoto, Namibia, Swaziland and South Africa.

South Africa is never cold

In fact, winter still exists in this country, usually starting from May to August. Before traveling to South Africa, don’t forget to see the weather forecast as Cape Town is very wet in the winter. Johannesburg is again characterized by thunderstorms in the summer, while Karoo also has harsh winter days.

Wild animals walk freely

When you first arrived in South Africa, the question you often asked was: “Where is the wild animal?”. The natural world here is rich with animals like elephants, monkeys, penguins, jaguars. However, visitors will not be able to see a lion walking on the street or people riding elephants to work, they have been isolated in a safe area. So to see wild animals, visit nature reserves throughout South Africa.

Local people speak African languages

African is not a language. The country of South Africa has 11 official languages ​​and most people can speak two of the total. English is very popular in South Africa, so you don’t need to worry about getting lost because you don’t know the language.

Country with only black people living

White people make up a small portion of South Africa’s population (about 8% in 2017 statistics). Most of them are of Dutch, German, English and French. After the Apartheid regime collapsed, Bishop Desmond Tutu named South Africa a rainbow country to indicate the harmony of skin, race and culture of different groups of people living together in one country.

South Africa’s unfold stories

Located on the southern tip of the African continent, the Republic of South Africa is a country characterized by the perfect combination of wild nature and the elegant modernity of people from many different cultures. Besides the beautiful tourist landscapes, South Africa also has its own unique features that few people pay attention to.

CONTAIN 3 CAPITALS

South Africa is the only country in the world to have 3 capitals coexisting. It is Pretoria – the administrative capital, Cape Town – the legislative capital and Bloemfontein – the judicial capital. In addition to these three cities, South Africa has another city that is widely regarded as the economic capital of Johannesburg.

MULTI NATIONAL LANGUAGE

South Africa has the most official languages in the world: 11 languages, and all are recognized as administrative languages. In rural areas, English is the common language of communication for people of different races – just like in Singapore. This is also the official language used in communication. Also in the West and South, Afrikaans and Dutch are more commonly used. A South African often knows at least 3 of the country’s 11 languages.

RAINBOW NATION

This nickname comes from Archbishop Desmond Tutu – a human rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner in 1984. After the 1994 democratic election, Nelson Mandela became the first black president of the Republic of South Africa. Archbishop Tutu uses the term “rainbow nation” to describe a country that has eradicated racism after a long time. Combined with the six-color flag, this term refers to the racial, tribal, religious, linguistic and landscape diversity across the country.

BIODIVERSITY

Kruger National Park is one of Africa’s largest wildlife sanctuaries; with an area of ​​19,635km2, nearly as wide as the Kingdom of Belgium. Kruger is home to 500 bird species, 100 reptiles, nearly 150 mammals, many amazing archaeological sites and diverse vegetation.

Best tourist sites in South Africa (Part 2)

  1. Victoria Falls:

Victoria Falls is the world’s largest waterfall with a length of over 1 km and a height of hundreds of meters. you can hear the waterfall from 40km away, and see it from 50m away. Victoria Falls was discovered in 1857 and is considered one of the most beautiful waterfalls in the world.

  1. Cape of Good Hope:

The Cape of Good Hope is a strip located in the southern pole of Africa. It was discovered in 1488 when explorer Bartolomeu Dias searched for a sea route from Europe to India. Known as an area with unusual sea weather and frequent storms, this place was originally called “Cape of storms” but was later renamed Good Hope. It has a 2km high lighthouse and is also an attractive place for tourists.

  1. Seal Island:

Located in False Bay not far from Cape Town, the seal island is a giant rock with many seals that make up the island. It is also home to sharks, you can also learn about sharks’ lives with a special tour on the island.

  1. Chapman’s Peak Drive:

There are very few places in the world with beautiful scenery comparable to the sunset scene at Chapman’s Peak Drive. The paved roads along the coast between Noordhoek and Hout Bay have magnificent views. After every bend, round the cliffs, the ecstatic moments of spectacular natural beauty will make any visitor fall in love. On the road there are picnic areas. Chapman’s peak drive is definitely a destination for all travelers.

  1. Boulders Beach:

Boulders Beach located near the town of Simon is made up of ancient granite rocks, protecting the coastline from wind and waves. Therefore, this place becomes an ideal swimming pool for children. The beach is located in front of the sea protection area of ​​Table National Park, the beach is always clean and safe. A special feature of this place is the African penguin. This is the only place where this bird lives. We can see them from the South African coast to Port Elizabeth, but the best place to see is Boulders beach.

  1. Voortrekker:

Voortrekker Monument is located in the north of South Africa in the nature conservation area. This is a special monument built to commemorate the pioneers of South Africa and the history of the Afrikaner. This place was inaugurated in 1949 and is located in a beautiful campus. It has the world’s longest elegant stone plank “Hall of heroes”.

  1. Church square:

Poet Square is a historical place of Pretoria. The founder of Pretoria, Marthinus Pretorius used this square as the church campus and market place. Surrounding the square is surrounded by churches. Famous historical and architectural works include Palace of Justice, Old Capitol theater, Tudor room and post office.

Best tourist sites in South Africa (Part 1)

South Africa, a tourist destination is gradually becoming an attractive place for travel lovers around the world. Let’s explore unique land with beautiful tourist sites.

  1. Table Mountain:

The table mountain is located at Afrikaans Tafelberg, Cape Town, is a flat top mountain with a sweeping view of Cape Town and Table Bay. The shape of mountains today is due to horizontal sandstone layers eroded by strong winds and water. With its distinctive shape, this mountain is a popular destination that attracts tourists from Cape Town. When you come here you can try climbing, hiking, camping and participating in other activities.

  1. Castle of Good Hope:

Castle of Good Hope is a famous place in South Africa built from 1666 to 1679, this is also the oldest building in South Africa. This castle was built by prisoners, slaves and other volunteers. The castle hall includes churches, living quarters, workshops, shops and even jails.

  1. Company Garden:

The Company Garden is the oldest garden in South Africa. When coming here, visitors will enjoy the fresh air in the beautiful garden with the view of Ban Mountain. There are various gardens layout such as Japanese style, European style, aquariums etc.

  1. Camps Bay:

Only 7 minutes from central Cape Town, the dreamy beach of Camps Bay is a popular place. Cape Town’s most beautiful beach is the path from the Sea Point to the bay. You can ride or walk along the road to enjoy the natural beauty here.

  1. Ostrich camp:

A 20-minute drive from central Cape Town, you can visit and join the ostrich tour. Not only do you have experiences with ostriches, you can also see and learn more than 200 different bird species. And from here, you can also take a photo with the world’s largest bird with the background of Mount Ba and the famous Hottentots Holland.

  1. Kirstenbosch Garden:

Kirstenbosch National Park is considered the most beautiful botanical garden in Africa. Opened in 1913 to promote the spectacular beauty of the rich flora of southern Africa. If you want to explore the flowers and plants of southern Africa, go to the Kirstenbosch garden, which gathers nearly all the plants in this land. The park has 528 hectares with 7000 different types. In 2004, the Kirstenbosch garden was recognized as one of the most visited places in the world and nominated as a world heritage.