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Things you should know before visiting South Africa (Part 2)

4. Open your mind
There are 11 official languages in South Africa, and most of them are indigenous to the country. Around 40% of the population speak either Xhosa or Zulu. Another major language is Afrikaans, a derivative of Dutch, which will find surprisingly easy to follow by northern Europeans. Although almost everywhere you go you can easilly get by with English – which is commonly spoken in all major cities and towns, at government departments, hotels, and banks.
You‘ve ever been nowhere like South Africa. Desmond Tutu, a famous South African, described South Africa by saying that they of many races, cultures, and languages become one nation. They are the Rainbow People of God. In such a diverse country it’s truely important to remain alert to respect the culture and stay safe.
African Impact Sarah Graham says that it’s natural that when offering broad-spectrum advice for travelers, guidebooks will resort to generalization. You will be able to get into all the nooks and crannies of South Africa and venture off the beaten track to feel the rhythm of the people. The people are friendly and warm, and excited to share their culture and stories with you.
5. Great Mobile Phone Coverage
Luckily, mobile phone coverage in South Africa is easy to access and extensive. Purchase a local SIM card from one of the South Africa’s four key telcos: MTN, Vodacom, Cell C and Telkom. When you arrive at the airport you can do this.
In major cities and towns reception and internet speeds are great, but when you head into the wilderness you will lose the ability to connect fast.
Remember that you can only use a local SIM on SIM-unlocked GSM phones. Before you leave check with your mobile network provider in your home country to make sure you can use it on your phone.
You should always buy a SIM card in store at a supermarket, kiosk, or one of the official outlets, never buy off a street seller.
Listen to our podcast if you want to know more about South Africa. We talk about when something goes wrong how World Nomads swings into action, the photographer who survived a deadly snake bite and plus a shark conservation.

Things you should know before visiting South Africa (Part 1)

South Africa is a great place to learn about the past from the harmonies of Ladysmith Black Mambazo to the legacy of Nelson Mandela. Culturally, South Africa have seen some of the most inspiring and engaging political reformations in modern times. It has a unique blend of African and Colonial cultures.

South Africa is a place to heed the advice of those in the know. From knowing the high costs of mobile phone coverage to which car to rent, these are the top tips to make your trip to South Africa as smooth as can be.

  1. Notice Your Location

Always be aware of your surroundings. Africa Adventure Consultants Kent Redding says that no matter how curious you are turn the other way and keep away if you hear or see a mob, angry-sounding demonstration or loud.

Don’t wander around aimlessly, pay attention to where you’re going. Both good and bad neighborhoods are often only one block away from each other in many parts of cities such as Johannesburgand Cape Town.

  1. Don‘t Pack Flashy

Dan Austin says, that you don’t wear expensive clothes or flashy jewelry for South Africa. Don’t flash cash really at any time in the country or when dealing with street vendors. Trade your lensesand  big fancy camera for a smaller point and shoot camera.

Pay attention everywhere you go. You can expect thievesor unwanted attention to be interested in you – especially in these neighborhoods with a bad reputation if you show off expensive items.

  1. Avoid Volunteering Scams

Make sure you book with a reputable organization if you want to volunteer in South Africa. Pick a truly ethical volunteer program if you want to give back to local communities.

At an orphanage where travelers are approached to help a popular scam has popped up. The kids here are made to look extremely poor for getting big donations out of sappy travelers. This is why we believe orphanage visits are actually not helpful.

The state visit of Nigerian President Buhari to South Africa

On Wednesday Mr. Muhammadu Buhari Nigerian President pay a state visit to South Africa after tensions between Africa’s leading economic powerhouses is stirred due to an outburst of xenophobic violence in and around Johannesburg.

The South African authorities look set to reject the demands of Buhari who is expected to push Ramaphosa to pay reparations for the Nigerians impacted by the violence.

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa and his counterpart struggle to kickstart their stuttering economies. They will on Thursday meet to discuss political cooperation and bolstering trade ties.

But the recent violence targeting foreigners  including Nigerians in South Africa threatens to dominate the talks. In the violence at least 12 people were killed and hundreds of migrant workers repatriated to the country. After some South African companies in Nigeria were targeted by revenge attacks, they were forced to close shop temporarily. The two governments offered “sincere apologies” in a bid to calm the anger and dispatched special envoys to each other’s capitals.

The Abuja’s presidency said Buhari would discuss the welfare of Nigerian, and build harmonious relations with their hosts via finding common grounds during the state visit.

The state visit takes three day was planned in early September before mobs descended on foreign-owned properties in and around Johannesburg.

Buhari was crowned as President a second term in February, is looking to boost Nigeria’s  agricultural and mining sectors and diversify Nigeria’s economy away from oil. South Africa could prove a key partner in doing so.

But, he has been blocking the flow of goods from neighbouring Nigeramaking and  Benin protectionist moves and ordering increased restrictions on food imports, athough in July he wil sign up to a milestone African free trade agreement.

Buhari’s state visit appears unlikely to radically strengthen relations between the two sides despite incentives to improve ties.

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 4)

Nelson Mandela is the pride of South Africans

Nelson Mandela continued the struggle against Apartheid, which forced Congress to ratify the law to abolish the brutal decree that existed for more than a century in this country (June 1991).

In July 1991, Nelson Mandela was elected Chairman of ANC and on May 10, 1994, after winning the first democratic election in South Africa, he became President of the Leather. The first color President of the Rainbow country.

Happy ending

Although the model of the era, known and respected by the world, Nelson Mandela was still a humble, polite and lovely person.

In his private life, Nelson was unlucky. He married for the first time in 1944 and had 4 children. The marriage ended in 1957 because he spent too little time with his family. In the midst of a fierce struggle for national liberation, Nelson met and married Winnie Madikizela in June 1958. Two daughters Zenani Mandela (1959) and Zindziswa Mandela (1960) were born.

When Nelson went to prison, his family life was completely ruined. He was very grateful to his wife who carried on her family and raised her children even though she herself was wanted and imprisoned. However, due to differences in awareness in some issues, in March 1996, Nelson and his wife divorced.

His last mate was Graca Simbine, the widow of President Mozambique. This is the beautiful love affair of two people in special places in modern African history.

Mr. Mandela always said that living with Graca Machel is a great happiness for both of them

When Graca’s first husband died in a plane crash in 1986, while struggling with misery to continue living in the terrible prison on Robben Island, Nelson wrote lines to comfort the widow of the President that he admires. Mrs. Graca replied. So began a correspondence between the two people who tied their lives to the fight against injustice. Happy smiled to Nelson on his 80th birthday: “I feel that living with her is a great happiness for both of us.”

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 4)

“I’m not a saint”

Shortly after the inauguration, President Nelson Mandela faced the risk of a new spiral of violence stemming from black hatred, the indispensable product of apartheid racism.

Nelson Mandela always thought that it was impossible to build a nation out of anger and violence. “We are fighting for progress in a way and towards an outcome that helps ensure that all people, whether white or black, become winners,” he said. With a generous heart, he promoted racial reconciliation, through negotiations to promote the democratic process in South Africa, creating a model for the adoption of political solutions to resolve conflicts. .

Madiba (Nelson’s affectionate name) was ordinary and simple, which made him a “popular great man” with the erudite knowledge of an academic, a basis to ensure peace and national reconciliation, avoiding the bloody civil war between people of color and ethnicity on this painful land. The way he chose to leave office is also very special. In African history, very few leaders want to leave office. Nelson Mandela decided to set a precedent for everyone to follow.

After leaving the presidency, Nelson Mandela continues to play an active role in many social organizations for human rights, fighting poverty and inequality. One of his main concerns is the fight against HIV/AIDS.

Responding to his honors as a saint of South Africa, Nelson asserted: “I have never, even the most remote aspect, thought of myself as a saint or tried to become a saint. I am just a normal person, due to special circumstances, I become a leader. ”

Nelson Mandela’s influence and great personality transcend national borders. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize (1993) and from 1999, the United Nations announced his birthday (July 18) every year to be called the “Mandela Day” to remember his contribution to the freedom of the world.

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 3)

Despite being treated harshly in various prison camps (he was locked up in the Atlantic Island Robben cell for 18 years out of 27 years in prison), Nelson Mandela still retains the temperament of a soldier who dare to commit to the great cause. Nelson has repeatedly denied the release of the government. That is why his reputation is growing in the hearts of South Africans despite the Apartheid government’s use of all means to prevent the spread of images and documents about him. After all, the harsh judgment of the authorities to destroy his will to fight has become ineffective.

In February 1990, after more than 10,000 days of imprisonment, Nelson was released at the age of 71. Emerging in the sky of South Africa as a great hope, right after the moment of watching the vast sky, he captured hands on the work of building freedom, mending the division in the heart of the nation. In his memoirs, he wrote: “When I stepped out of prison, my mission was to free both oppressed and oppressive people. Some people say that mission is complete. But I know it’s not. The truth is we don’t have freedom yet; we have merely gained the freedom to choose free and unrestrained lives. We have not yet taken the last steps of the journey but are only the first step on a long and difficult journey. To be free, it is not simply to remove the chains of a human being, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. The real challenge to our belief in freedom has only just begun. ”

“Thousands of ineffective injustices awaken in me indignation that demands to fight against the brutal political system that imprisoned my nation. It is impossible to remember the specific day I began to devote myself to the cause of my national liberation, my people, for me, to engage in that struggle was simple, because I could not do otherwise.”

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 2)

In 1947, Nelson was elected to the Standing and directly served as Secretary of the Transvaal Union. It was his first public title at the African National Congress (ANC), the leader of the national liberation struggle movement to gain freedom and equality for South Africans.

In the white election of 1948, Daniel Malan’s National Party with Apartheid won the election. Under Malan’s iron hand, a series of bizarre laws serving the worst and bloodiest racist policy in civilized human history have been issued. ANC organized a non-violent protest movement, calling on all strikers, MITs to protest. In 1952, Nelson opened a lawyer’s office to defend the poor as well as participate in peaceful opposition activities. But in 1956 Nelson and 150 others were arrested with treason. Thanks to the defense of the lawyer, troubled for 5 years, the defendants were acquitted.

When the path of non-violent struggle was banned, the ANC leadership decided to establish an “armed wing” but an “independent organization” under the administration of the ANC. In November 1961, Nelson Mandela became the leader of the armed wing MK, using force in his struggle.

In early 1962, Nelson secretly toured a series of countries: Tanzania, Sudan, Ethiopie, Egypt, Algeria, Ghinea, Senagal and England to expand relations and enlist support in politics, economy and training military for MK. Upon returning home (August 1962), he was arrested on charges of inciting unrest and leaving South Africa illegally, sentenced to five years in prison. In June 1964, Nelson was sentenced to life hardship for “planning to destroy the state”. In court, Nelson Mandela was stunned: “I devoted my life to the South African people’s struggle. I upheld the ideal of democracy and free society in which all people equally live together in the same conditions and abilities. It is an ideal that I take for living and hope to achieve. But if I need, I will also sacrifice for that ideal. “

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 1)

Nelson Mandela was great not only because of the struggle and unyielding years in the prison, the journey to abolish the Apartheid regime or the national reconciliation effort. He was immortal because he built the foundations for democracy in South Africa.

From prisoner to president

Nelson Mandela (1918 – 2013) was born in a prison family in the village of Mvezo, Umtata district, capital of Transkei state, South Africa with the name Rolihlahla Mandela. Seven and a half years old, he went to school. During the first day of school, the white teacher gave him the English name Nelson. By the end of his life, Nelson Mandela still did not understand what that name meant and why the teacher gave him that name.

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality

The father died when Nelson was 9, another chief adopted him. In his memoir “Long Walk To Freedom”, Nelson Mandela recounted that it was the time he was raised and educated strictly to be a “successor”.

After graduating from high school, Nelson attended Fort Hare University, the “nursery” of South African intellectuals. Nelson studied hard and actively participated in sports activities. In the last academic year (1941), he was forced to leave the school because he did not succumb to the mischief of the director in the election of the Student Council Executive Committee.

Nelson came to work at a law firm and attended correspondence at the University of South Africa in Johannesburg. Despite spending too little money, Nelson still owes accommodation fee every month. Nelson had to wear the old suit his boss gave him for 5 years with lots of patches.

Life in Johannesburg opened for Nelson a new world. He was painfully aware: An African child was born only in a maternity home for Africans, only to board a bus for Africans, only in the designated area for Africans, to go to school only and find jobs for Africans and can always be stopped in the middle of the road, if he/she doesn’t bring identification cards he/she can be thrown into the jail.

 

How did sports heal South Africa? (Part 2)

The Apartheid government soon realized that they had made a serious mistake when organizing the friendly match, so after that, football was severely suppressed in this country, to the point that white players had to retire. In schools, football is replaced by other sports such as Cricket and Rugby. Six years later, South African football was “revived” after the FIFA ban, when Sono reappeared as a hero to save the country’s football. After the feat of scoring four goals in the Argentina net, Sono went to the United States to play for New York Cosmos club, playing alongside the names of world football names such as: Pele, Beckenbauer … Earning good amount of money, in 1982, Sono returned to his hometown, bought Highland Park, the symbol of Apartheid regime. On the FIFA website on that day there was an article about the event: “It was a trade event that symbolized significance during the time when colored people were suppressed by the Apartheid regime. FIFA appreciates Sono’s work as a part of bringing South African football back to world football.

Rugby, football in South African society

Last week, the owner and team coach Jomo Cosmos (new name of Highland Park team) Sono sent deep condolences to the family of Joost van der Westhuizen-player who went into history with the victory to rise South Africa in Rugby World Cup championship 1995. On February 6, after 6 years of fighting Parkinson’s disease, Joost van der Westhuizen died at age 45 at his home.

For rugby lovers in South Africa, Joost van der Westhuizen is considered an irreplaceable legend. He made 89 appearances in the national team stage of 1993-2003 and was a key player in helping South Africa to win the Rugby World Cup 1995.

We returned to South Africa in the 60s of the last century, the rugby tournaments here included all black players, without any white players. We would imagine no football match having white player. In South African society at that time, people of color and white as on two parallel lines.

How did sports heal South Africa? (Part 1)

In order to bring the 2010 World Cup to South Africa, there was a real war in FIFA. Because at the time of the 2004 vote, many skeptics of South Africa could successfully organize the biggest football festival on the planet.

But before talking about the 2010 World Cup or Apartheid’s racist regime, to mention Rugby, sports has contributed to heal the people of this richest African country.

A year before the 2010 World Cup, director Eastwood produced the movie “Invictus”, describing the victory of the South African team at the Rugby World Cup 1995, with the role of President Nelson Mandela. The language is an unscathed sports movie but “Invictus” has a total budget of 62 million USD. The film about the Rugby World Cup in 1995 but discusses the struggle against racism that has remained since the post-Apartheid era. Movie “Invictus” about Rugby, but actually, the story is about football. That’s right, because one year after “Invictus” premiered, the 2010 World Cup kicked off in South Africa.

In April 1963, the South African government closed all stadiums. People of color have an excuse to carry out protests for fairness but all methods are ineffective. In response to the public’s request, in 1976, the South African government organized a terrible football match: the white team played against the colored team. In 1976 and 1977, there were three political “smells” like this that took place in the Rand Stadium with the victory of the white team. In order to appease the reaction of the public and the international community, on March 16, 1976, South Africa invited the Argentine team to join friendly football. For the first time, there was a South African football team with a mix of colored, white leather. However, on the Rand stadium stands, with a capacity of more than 3 ten thousand spectators, white and colored fans still have to sit in the different lots.