Monthly Archives: August 2019

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 3)

Despite being treated harshly in various prison camps (he was locked up in the Atlantic Island Robben cell for 18 years out of 27 years in prison), Nelson Mandela still retains the temperament of a soldier who dare to commit to the great cause. Nelson has repeatedly denied the release of the government. That is why his reputation is growing in the hearts of South Africans despite the Apartheid government’s use of all means to prevent the spread of images and documents about him. After all, the harsh judgment of the authorities to destroy his will to fight has become ineffective.

In February 1990, after more than 10,000 days of imprisonment, Nelson was released at the age of 71. Emerging in the sky of South Africa as a great hope, right after the moment of watching the vast sky, he captured hands on the work of building freedom, mending the division in the heart of the nation. In his memoirs, he wrote: “When I stepped out of prison, my mission was to free both oppressed and oppressive people. Some people say that mission is complete. But I know it’s not. The truth is we don’t have freedom yet; we have merely gained the freedom to choose free and unrestrained lives. We have not yet taken the last steps of the journey but are only the first step on a long and difficult journey. To be free, it is not simply to remove the chains of a human being, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. The real challenge to our belief in freedom has only just begun. ”

“Thousands of ineffective injustices awaken in me indignation that demands to fight against the brutal political system that imprisoned my nation. It is impossible to remember the specific day I began to devote myself to the cause of my national liberation, my people, for me, to engage in that struggle was simple, because I could not do otherwise.”

Nelson Mandela – Symbol of freedom and equality (Part 2)

In 1947, Nelson was elected to the Standing and directly served as Secretary of the Transvaal Union. It was his first public title at the African National Congress (ANC), the leader of the national liberation struggle movement to gain freedom and equality for South Africans.

In the white election of 1948, Daniel Malan’s National Party with Apartheid won the election. Under Malan’s iron hand, a series of bizarre laws serving the worst and bloodiest racist policy in civilized human history have been issued. ANC organized a non-violent protest movement, calling on all strikers, MITs to protest. In 1952, Nelson opened a lawyer’s office to defend the poor as well as participate in peaceful opposition activities. But in 1956 Nelson and 150 others were arrested with treason. Thanks to the defense of the lawyer, troubled for 5 years, the defendants were acquitted.

When the path of non-violent struggle was banned, the ANC leadership decided to establish an “armed wing” but an “independent organization” under the administration of the ANC. In November 1961, Nelson Mandela became the leader of the armed wing MK, using force in his struggle.

In early 1962, Nelson secretly toured a series of countries: Tanzania, Sudan, Ethiopie, Egypt, Algeria, Ghinea, Senagal and England to expand relations and enlist support in politics, economy and training military for MK. Upon returning home (August 1962), he was arrested on charges of inciting unrest and leaving South Africa illegally, sentenced to five years in prison. In June 1964, Nelson was sentenced to life hardship for “planning to destroy the state”. In court, Nelson Mandela was stunned: “I devoted my life to the South African people’s struggle. I upheld the ideal of democracy and free society in which all people equally live together in the same conditions and abilities. It is an ideal that I take for living and hope to achieve. But if I need, I will also sacrifice for that ideal. “